Public comment workshop scheduled for Greers Ferry Tailwater Management Plan

Greers Ferry Lake Tailwaters TroutHEBER SPRINGS – The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Trout Management Program will host a public workshop at 6 p.m., July 21 at the Heber Springs Community Center to receive public comments and feedback on the newly developed draft of its plan to manage the Greers Ferry Tailwater.

This is the second public workshop to involve the public and the angling community in the future of the 30-mile long trout fishery on the Little Red River below Greers Ferry Dam. The current management plan was developed in 2006, and management actions outlined in that plan were implemented in 2007. Biologists now want to determine if those strategies have worked and whether public expectations of the fishery have changed.

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing Report – July 20, 2016

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing Report – July 20, 2016

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 460.37 feet msl (normal conservation pool – 461.44 msl).

(updated 7-20-2016) Tommy Cauley of Fish Finder Guide Service said the water level is 2.18 below normal pool and falling. The fishing for all species is a little slow but normal for a highland reservoir for this time of year. Early and late are the best time to fish with some night catches being good also.
Most black basses are deep, with a few staying shallow out on the drops in bends of creeks and rivers on the side of points and humps. Try Texas-rigged worms, Alabama rigs, football head jigs and swim baits. There has been some schooling going on at various places in the lake.
Crappie are suspended around any wood structure all over the lake, ranging from 15- 30 feet deep. Jigs, Roadrunners and minnows have all been good.
The catfish bite is good this time of year on jugs and trotlines baited with a variety of baits on flats next to deep water.
The walleye bite is on and off with each day being a little different. Try dragging nightcrawlers or crankbaits in 18 to 30 feet of water on small chunk rock banks.
Bream fishing is good around beds with crickets all over the lake in 18 to 27 feet of water.
The hybrid and white bass fishing is a little different each day as well, some are schooling on various parts of the lake , most are settled on some deeper structure for the most part, with spoons, in-line spinners, swim baits and topwater baits working.

(updated 7-6-2016) Cody Smith of Fish Greers Ferry guide service reports that water surface temperature is ranging in the upper 80s. Water levels are normal for this time of year with small releases from the dam daily. Fishing has been best from early morning hours before 9 and once again during the waning hours of the day. Smith and his anglers have caught every species that swims in the lake over the past week and it seems the bulk of their game fish are all relating to the growing bream population. The 15-25-feet depths around Corps of Engineers habitat has produced the best for them. Live bait options and larger artificial in bluegill and darker colors have been best. White bass and hybrids have been scarce on top, while decent numbers can be found and captured on a variety of jigging spoons in the 20-45-feet zone.

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing Report – July 13, 2016

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing Report – July 13, 2016

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 460.61 feet msl (normal conservation pool – 461.44 msl).
(updated 7-13-2016) Tommy Cauley of Fish Finder Guide Service said bass fishing is going good on and off at different times of the day and night.

Arkansas Game and Fish Photo

Use Texas rigged worms, spinnerbaits, football heads and jig head worms as well as drop-shot rigs for the best bite 25-40 feet deep out on drops and end of points.
The bream fishing is good on crickets out to about 28-30 feet for the bigger fish.
The crappie are suspended over brush piles and in the pole timber, and with some patience can be caught with road runners or jigs tipped with minnows in 15-25 feet of water.
The walleye bite is on and off, as is pretty typical for this time of year, but they have to eat as well. Try dragging crawlers in 18-28 feet of water or if they are suspended try crankbaits.
The hybrid and white bass are schooling over various parts of the lake at different times of the day and staying on structure the rest. The night bite is going good right now on spoons, in-line spinners, swimbaits and live bait; try in 25-40 feet depth for the best and most consistent action.
(updated 7-6-2016) Cody Smith of Fish Greers Ferry guide service reports that water surface temperature is ranging in the upper 80s. Water levels are normal for this time of year with small releases from the dam daily. Fishing has been best from early morning hours before 9 and once again during the waning hours of the day. Smith and his anglers have caught every species that swims in the lake over the past week and it seems the bulk of their game fish are all relating to the growing bream population. The 15-25-feet depths around Corps of Engineers habitat has produced the best for them. Live bait options and larger artificial in bluegill and darker colors have been best. White bass and hybrids have been scarce on top, while decent numbers can be found and captured on a variety of jigging spoons in the 20-45-feet zone.

Casting Test: Does Rod Size Matter? (7”6″ Vs’ 9’6″ Rod)

Catfish Rod Casting Test

Several weeks ago I posted the video announcing the release of the new 9’6″ Heavy Power catfish rod in my signature series catfish rod line from Whisker Seeker Tackle.

While testing this fishing rod I did a LOT of casting and there’s no doubt you can really get some distance with your catfish baits with the longer fishing rods. I spent a lot of time testing on the water and while doing so trying to get a feel for just how much further these long catfish rods cast. No matter how hard I tried I couldn’t figure it out it on the water so I decided to go “redneck scientific”.

I headed down to my sons high school where he plays football (the Saginaw High School Rough Riders) and setup on the football field for a casting test using the yard markers on the football field as guides (I’m sure that’s not embarrassing for a teenage kid) and put the 7’6″ Heavy Power Rod catfish rod and the 9’6″ Heavy Power Catfish Rod up against each other in a casting test smackdown.


Does rod size matter? Catfish rod casting SMACKDOWN?
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How I Conducted The Catfish Rod Casting Test

Here’s how I did the test, taking careful steps to make sure everything was exactly the same (except the rod length).

I took two brand new Abu Garcia 6500C3 catfish reels and spooled them with brand spanking new and fresh Whisker Seeker Tackle monofilament fishing line. I put one of the catfish reels on a new 7’6″ Heavy Power Rod and one on a new 9’6″ Heavy Power Rod. I tied on a 3 ounce no roll sinker on each rod.

With all the catfishing gear set up and in place I headed to the football field and setup in the end zone right at the goal line.

I made three casts from the end zone with each fishing rod and then took an average distance of the three casts with each rod. The wind was at my back for the casts with both fishing rods. I was only able to do three casts with each rod because there were some people showing up at the football field (and I almost hit one of them in the head with a three ounce no roll sinker).

Check out the video for more details and to see just how much farther the 9’6″ Chad Ferguson Signature Series Catfish Rod from Whisker Seeker Tackle casts than the 7’6″ model.

You can order your own Chad Ferguson Signature Series Catfish Rods direct from Whisker Seeker Tackle just click here to check out the Medium Heavy Power models and click here to check out the Heavy Power Models.

Get even more details on the catfish rods here and be sure to check out the Ultimate Guide To Catfish Rods also.

The post Casting Test: Does Rod Size Matter? (7”6″ Vs’ 9’6″ Rod) appeared first on Catfish Edge: Cutting Edge Catfishing.

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing Report – July 6, 2016

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing Report – July 6, 2016

As of Wednesday, the Army Corps of Engineers reports the lake’s elevation at 460.99 feet msl (normal conservation pool – 461.44 msl).
(updated 7-6-2016) Tommy Cauley of Fish Finder Guide Service said the fishing has gotten tougher as of late; it got so hot so quick that everything kind of went into shock mode.
The black bass are in their summer mode now for sure with the water temperature at 88 and hotter. Drops deep around brush piles are the most consistent method. A few bass are shallow but some stay shallow all year and some are hanging out on the first drops. Try Texas rigged worms, rig lizards and Senko’s. The shallow fish will bite a spinnerbait if you chase the wind some, and try a jighead worm on the in-between fish. Some are schooling early and late all over the lake.
The bream are eating well out 20-28 feet of water on crickets and crawlers.
The crappie are hanging out 15-30 feet deep over brush piles and around standing timber. Use Road Runners, jigs and minnows.
The walleye have moved a little deeper to about 25-30 feet of water; try crawlers drug around and crankbaits cranked real slow.
The catfishing has even been a little off, but use 12-15 feet drops on jugs and lines close to deep water for the best catching on a variety of baits.
The hybrid and white bass fishing has been slow somewhat. Some fish are eating the new threadfin but are very inconsistent all over the lake. The structure bite has slowed as they’re acclimate to the hotter water and generation. Try topwater baits for the schoolers, and use spoons, in-line spinners, swimbaits and live bait for the deeper fish.
(updated 7-6-2016) Cody Smith of Fish Greers Ferry guide service reports that water surface temperature is ranging in the upper 80s. Water levels are normal for this time of year with small releases from the dam daily. Fishing has been best from early morning hours before 9 and once again during the waning hours of the day. Smith and his anglers have caught every species that swims in the lake over the past week and it seems the bulk of their game fish are all relating to the growing bream population. The 15-25-feet depths around Corps of Engineers habitat has produced the best for them. Live bait options and larger artificial in bluegill and darker colors have been best.
White bass and hybrids have been scarce on top, while decent numbers can be found and captured on a variety of jigging spoons in the 20-45-feet zone.